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Microsoft word - chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases in the u

Exploring The Root Causes Of Infertility You can give away this book as a gift .You HAVE NO Right to edit the contents. Disclaimer
Do not consider this User-generated content as medical advice. Never delay or disregard seeking professional medical advice from your doctor or other qualified healthcare provider because of something you have read in this material. You should always speak with your doctor before you start, stop, or change any prescribed part of your care plan or treatment. We understand that reading individual, real-life experiences can be a helpful resource but it is never a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment from a qualified health care provider. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor n this feature we shall attempt to look at another cause of common fertility issues. They are around us and are called Infections. They are mostly Itransmitted through sexual intercourse and in some cases through toilets. Chlamydia is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases today. This infection is easily spread because it often causes no symptoms and may be unknowingly passed to sexual partners. In fact, about 75% of infections in women and 50% in men are without symptoms. It is not easy to tell if you are infected with chlamydia since symptoms are not always apparent. But when they do occur, they are usually noticeable within one to three weeks of contact and can include the following: Abnormal vaginal discharge that may have an odor Itching or burning in or around the vagina Small amounts of clear or cloudy discharge from the tip of the penis Burning and itching around the opening of the penis There are a few different tests your doctor can use to diagnose chlamydia. He or she will probably use a swab to take a sample from the urethra in men or from the cervix in women and then will send the specimen to a laboratory to be analyzed. There are also other tests which check a urine sample for the presence of the bacteria. If you have chlamydia, your doctor will prescribe oral antibiotics, usually azithromycin (Zithromax) or doxycycline. Your doctor will also recommend your partner(s) be treated as well to prevent reinfection and further spread of the disease. With treatment, the infection should clear up in about a week or two. It is important to finish all of your antibiotics even if you feel better. Women with severe chlamydia infection may require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics (medicine given through a vein), and pain medicine. After taking antibiotics, people should be re-tested to be sure the infection is cured. This is particularly important if you are unsure that your partner(s) obtained treatment. Do not have sex until you are sure both you and your partner no longer have the disease. What Happens If I Don't Get My Chalmydia Treated? If you do not get treated for chlamydia, you run the risk of several health problems. For women. If left untreated, chlamydia infection can cause pelvic inflammatory disease which can lead to damage of the fallopian tubes (the tubes connecting the ovaries to the uterus) or even cause infertility (the inability to have children). Untreated chlamydia infection could also increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy (when the fertilized egg implants and develops outside the uterus.) Furthermore, chlamydia may cause premature births (giving birth too early) and the infection can be passed along from the mother to her child during childbirth, causing an eye infection, blindness, or pneumonia in the newborn. For men. Chlamydia can cause a condition called nongonococcal urethritis (NGU) -- an infection of the urethra (the tube by which men and women pass urine), epididymitis -- an infection of the epididymis (the tube that carries sperm away from the testes), or proctitis -- an inflammation of the rectum. How Can I Prevent a Chlamydia Infection? To reduce your risk of a chlamydia infection: Use condoms correctly every time you have sex. Limit the number of sex partners, and do not go back and forth between partners. Practice sexual abstinence, or limit sexual contact to one uninfected partner. If you think you are infected, avoid sexual contact and see a doctor. Any genital symptoms such as discharge or burning during urination or an unusual sore or rash should be a signal to stop having sex and to consult a doctor immediately. If you are told you have chlamydia or any other sexually transmitted disease and receive treatment, you should notify all of your recent sex partners so that they can see a doctor and be treated. Because chlamydia often occurs without symptoms, people who are infected may unknowingly infect their sex partners. Many doctors recommend that all persons who have more than one sex partner should be tested for chlamydia regularly, even in the absence of symptoms. Also called the "clap" or "drip," gonorrhea is a contagious disease transmitted most often through sexual contact with an infected person. Gonorrhea may also be spread by contact with infected bodily fluids, so that a mother could pass on the infection to her newborn during childbirth. Both men and women can get gonorrhea. The infection is easily spread and occurs most often in people who have many sex partners. Gonorrhea is caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, a bacterium that can grow and multiply easily in mucus membranes of the body. Gonorrhea bacteria can grow in the warm, moist areas of the reproductive tract, including the cervix (opening to the womb), uterus (womb), and fallopian tubes (egg canals) in women, and in the urethra (the tube that carries urine from the bladder to outside the body) in women and men. The bacteria can also grow in the mouth, throat, and anus. Gonorrhea is a very common infectious disease in Nigeria. Each year, there are as many as 700,000 new cases, with less than half of them reported. Sexually active teenagers have one of the highest rates of reported infections. Not all people infected with gonorrhea have symptoms, so knowing when to seek treatment can be tricky. When symptoms do occur, they are often within two to 10 days after exposure, but they can take up to 30 days to develop and include the following: Greenish yellow or whitish discharge from the vagina Swollen glands in the throat (due to oral sex) In some women, symptoms are so mild that they escape unnoticed. Many women with gonorrhea discharge think they have a yeast infection and self-treat with over-the-counter yeast infection drug. Because vaginal discharge can be a sign of a number of different problems, it is best to always seek the advice of a doctor to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment. Greenish yellow or whitish discharge from the penis Swollen glands in the throat (due to oral sex) In men, symptoms usually appear two to 14 days after infection. To diagnose gonorrhea, your doctor will use a swab to take a sample of fluid from the urethra in men or from the cervix in women. The specimen will then be sent to a lab to be analyzed. You also may be given a throat or anal culture to see if the infection is in your throat or anus. There are other tests which check a urine sample for the presence of the bacteria. You may need to wait for several days for your tests to come back from the lab. Gonorrhea and chlamydia, another common sexually transmitted disease, often occur together, so you may be tested and treated for both. Yes. Gonorrhea can be treated and cured. To cure a gonorrhea infection, your doctor will give you either an oral or injectable antibiotic. Your partner should also be treated at the same time to prevent reinfection and further spread of the disease. It is important to take all of your antibiotics even if you feel better. Also, never take someone else's medication to treat your illness. By doing so, you may make the infection more difficult to treat. In addition, Tell anyone you have had sex with recently that you are infected. This is important because gonorrhea may have no symptoms. Women, especially, may not have symptoms and may not seek testing or treatment unless alerted by their sex partners. Don't have sex until you have completed taking all of your medicine. What Happens if I Don't Treat Gonorrhea? Untreated gonorrhea can cause serious and permanent problems in both women and men. In women, if left untreated, the infection can cause pelvic inflammatory disease, which may damage the fallopian tubes (the tubes connecting the ovaries to the uterus) or even lead to infertility, and untreated gonorrhea infection could increase the risk of ectopic pregnancy (when the fertilized egg implants and develops outside the uterus), a dangerous condition for both the mother and baby. In men, gonorrhea can cause epididymitis, a painful condition of the testicles that can sometimes lead to infertility if left untreated. Without prompt treatment, gonorrhea can also affect the prostate and can lead to scarring inside the urethra, making urination difficult. Gonorrhea can spread to the blood or joints. This condition can be life-threatening. Also, people with gonorrhea can more easily contract HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. People with HIV infection and gonorrhea are more likely than people with HIV infection alone to transmit HIV to someone else. How Does Gonorrhea Affect Pregnancy and Childbirth? Gonorrhea in a pregnant woman can cause premature delivery or spontaneous abortion. The infected mother may give the infection to her infant as the baby passes through the birth canal during delivery. This can cause blindness, joint infection, or a life-threatening blood infection in the baby. Treatment of gonorrhea as soon as it is detected in pregnant women will lessen the risk of these complications. Pregnant women should consult a doctor for appropriate medications. To reduce your risk of gonorrhea infection: Use condoms correctly every time you have sex. Limit the number of sex partners, and do not go back and forth between partners. Practice sexual abstinence, or limit sexual contact to one uninfected partner. If you think you are infected, avoid sexual contact and see a doctor. Any genital symptoms such as discharge or burning during urination or an unusual sore or rash should be a signal to stop having sex and to consult a doctor immediately. If you are told you have gonorrhea or any other STD and receive treatment, you should notify all of your recent sex partners so that they can see a doctor and be treated. Syphilis is a highly contagious disease spread primarily by sexual activity, including oral and anal sex. Occasionally, the disease can be passed to another person through prolonged kissing or close bodily contact. Although this disease is spread from sores, the vast majority of those sores go unrecognized. The infected person is often unaware of the disease and unknowingly passes it on to his or her sexual partner. Pregnant women with the disease can spread it to their baby. This disease, called congenital syphilis, can cause abnormalities or even death to the child. Syphilis cannot be spread by toilet seats, door knobs, swimming pools, hot tubs, bath tubs, shared clothing, or eating utensils. Syphilis is caused by the bacteria Treponema pallidum. Syphilis was once a major public health threat, commonly causing serious long-term health problems such as arthritis, brain damage, and blindness. It defied effective treatment until the late 1940s, when the antibiotic penicillin was first developed. Syphilis infection occurs in three distinct stages: Early or primary syphilis. People with primary syphilis will develop one or more sores. The sores resemble large round bug bites and are often hard and painless. They occur on the genitals or in or around the mouth somewhere between 10-90 days (average three weeks) after exposure. Even without treatment they heal without a scar within six weeks. The secondary stage may last one to three months and begins within six weeks to six months after exposure. People with secondary syphilis experience a rosy "copper penny" rash typically on the palms of the hands and soles of the feet. However, rashes with a different appearance may occur on other parts of the body, sometimes resembling rashes caused by other diseases. They may also experience moist warts in the groin, white patches on the inside of the mouth, swollen lymph glands, fever, and weight loss. Like primary syphilis, secondary syphilis will resolve without treatment. Latent syphilis. This is where the infection lies dormant (inactive) without causing symptoms. Tertiary syphilis. If the infection isn't treated, it may then progress to a stage characterized by severe problems with the heart, brain, and nerves that can result in paralysis, blindness, dementia, deafness, impotence, and even death if it's not treated. Syphilis can be easily diagnosed with a quick and inexpensive blood test given at your doctor's office or at a public health clinic. If you've been infected with syphilis for less than a year, a single dose of penicillin is usually enough to destroy the infection. For those allergic to penicillin, tetracycline or doxycycline can be given instead. If you are in a later stage of disease, more doses will be needed. People who are being treated for syphilis must abstain from sexual contact until the infection is completely gone. Sexual partners of people with syphilis should be tested and, if necessary, treated. If syphilis is left untreated, it can cause serious and permanent problems such as dementia, blindness, or death. How Does Syphilis Affect a Pregnant Woman and Her Baby? Depending on how long a pregnant woman has been infected with syphilis, she has a good chance of having a stillbirth (birth of an infant who has died prior to delivery) or of giving birth to a baby who dies shortly after birth. If not treated immediately, an infected baby may be born without symptoms but could develop them within a few weeks. These signs and symptoms can be very serious. Untreated babies may become developmentally delayed, have seizures, or die. To reduce your risk of syphilis infection: Avoid intimate contact with a person you know is infected If you do not know if a sexual partner is infected, use a condom in every sexual encounter What Is the Outlook for People With Syphilis? Syphilis is a curable disease with prompt diagnosis and treatment. However, if treated too late, there may be permanent damage to the heart and brain even after the infection is destroyed. Vaginitis is infection or inflammation of the vagina. It can cause itching and burning, a change in vaginal discharge, and sometimes pain during sex. Vaginitis may be caused by bacteria, yeast, or other organisms. Bath products, douches, and spermicides also can irritate the vagina and cause itching and discomfort. The three most common types of vaginitis and their causes are: Yeast infection. A healthy vagina normally contains a small number of yeast cells, along with a certain number of bacteria. Normally there aren't enough of the yeast cells to cause problems. But sometimes something happens to the vagina that lets the yeast cells multiply quickly and take over, causing symptoms. Taking antibiotics sometimes causes this. Being pregnant, taking birth control pills that contain estrogen, or having hormone replacement therapy can also cause it. So can some health problems, like diabetes or HIV infection. Bacterial vaginosis. This happens when some of the bacteria normally found in the vagina are able to multiply quickly, causing symptoms. Experts are not sure what causes this. But certain things make it more likely to happen. These include having more than one sex partner, having a female sex partner, having a sexually transmitted disease, using an IUD for birth control, and douching. Trichomoniasis. This is a sexually transmitted disease caused by a parasite. You get it by having sex with someone who has it. It is commonly called trich (say "trick"). Another type of vaginitis is atrophic vaginitis. This is an irritation of the vagina caused by thinning tissues and less moisture in the vaginal walls. This often occurs with menopause as a result of the decrease in the hormone estrogen. Surgery to remove the ovaries can have the same effect. A change in your normal vaginal discharge, including gray, green, or yellow discharge. Vaginal redness, swelling, itching, or pain. Your doctor will check your vagina for redness and swelling and will take a sample of vaginal discharge. The sample can be tested in a lab to see what is causing the problem. If you are pregnant, talk with your doctor if you have any symptoms. Some problems can affect your pregnancy, so it is important to talk with your doctor and get the right treatment. Yeast infection: If you have had a yeast infection before and can recognize the symptoms, and you aren't pregnant, you can treat yourself at home with medicines you can buy without a prescription. You can use an antifungal cream or suppository that you put into your vagina. Or your doctor may prescribe antifungal tablets that you swallow. Bacterial vaginosis: Doctors usually use antibiotics to treat this problem. It is usually a mild problem. But it can lead to more serious problems, so it’s a good idea to see your doctor and get treatment. Trichomoniasis: This disease is also treated with antibiotics. Both you and your sex partner need treatment. Atrophic vaginitis: This usually is treated with estrogen creams or tablets. Do not take antibiotics unless you really need to. Do not use feminine deodorant sprays or other perfumed products in or around your vagina. During your period, change tampons at least 3 times a day, or switch between tampons and pads. Don't leave tampons in for more than 8 hours. And be sure to remove the last tampon you use. Use a condom during sex. Limit your number of sex partners. What is pelvic inflammatory disease (PID)? Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an infection of a woman’s reproductive organs. Treating PID right away is important, because PID can cause scar tissue in the pelvic organs and lead to infertility. It can also lead to other problems, such as pelvic pain and tubal (ectopic) pregnancy. PID is caused by bacteria entering the reproductive organs through the cervix. When the cervix is infected, bacteria from the vagina can more easily get into and infect the uterus and fallopian tubes. You may be more likely to get PID if you: Have a sexually transmitted infection (STI). The most common causes of PID are gonorrhea and chlamydia. Are at risk for STIs. You are at higher risk for STIs if you are young and you don't use condoms when you have sex. Having more than one sex partner also increases your risk for STIs. Have bacterial vaginosis, which is not an STI. Have recently had an IUD inserted or had an abortion. At first, PID may not cause any symptoms or may cause only mild symptoms, such as bleeding or discharge from the vagina. Some women don't even know they have it. They only find out later, when they can't get pregnant or they have pelvic pain. As the infection spreads, the most common symptom is pain in the lower belly. The pain has been described as crampy or as a dull and constant ache. It may be worse during sex, bowel movements, or when you urinate. Some women also have a fever. Even though PID causes mild or no symptoms, it can still cause serious problems. So you need to understand what puts you at risk for PID or STIs and see your doctor if you have any unusual symptoms. Your doctor will ask about your lifestyle and symptoms. He or she will examine you and do tests to see if you have PID. The test results may take some time. For this reason, your doctor will treat you for the disease before the test results are ready. Treating PID early is important to prevent problems later on. Your doctor may test you for the most common causes of PID and may also do blood tests to look for signs of infection. Your doctor may also order an ultrasound to see if there are other possible causes of your symptoms. An ultrasound may also show if there is damage to the fallopian tubes, uterus, or ovaries from PID. To treat PID, you will need to take antibiotics. Take them as directed. If you don't take all of the medicine, the infection may come back. If your infection was caused by an STI, your sex partner(s) will also need to be treated so you don't get infected again. Do not have sex until both of you have finished your medicine, and be sure to follow up with your doctor to make certain that the treatment is working. If you have a very bad case of PID or are pregnant and infected, you may need to stay in the hospital and get antibiotics through a vein (intravenous). Sometimes surgery is needed to drain a pocket of infection, called an abscess. Your risk of infertility increases each time you have PID, so it is very important to prevent future infections. Using a condom each time you have sex can reduce your chance of getting an STI that could lead to PID. Above is a detailed explanation of some common Infections that can lead to infertility. It is important to take note and if you have any of the symptoms outlined in the list, please and please see a doctor. I believe I did not bore you but only had to show you how important your overall health is and how you can walk your way to freedom.

Source: http://infertiltysolutionsng.info/books/part2.pdf

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TIKOSYN® (dofetilide) TREATMENT GUIDELINES These guidelines are part of the TIKOSYN Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program. Prescribers and Pharmacists are required to read these guidelines and sign a Certification Form acknowledging they understand the potential risks of TIKOSYN in order to prescribe and dispense TIKOSYN. The product information in this document is intended

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