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Microsoft word - etiquette for the boat diver

Etiquette for the Boat Diver
This information will assist you in understanding diving etiquette and diving procedures. The dive industry and its employees are providing you with a service so that you may safely enjoy the sport. General:
Be a considerate diver. Inform the dive staff if they can help or answer any questions, and they will go out of their way to assist you. If you do not feel comfortable about a particular dive, be it the conditions or depth, then speak up, it's your dive as well, and you should dive within your personal limitations. Remember that good divers are responsible divers! Diving from boats:
Boat procedures vary from operator to operator even when the same types of boats are used. You are strongly advised to listen and adhere to: • Boat safety procedures; the boat Captain prior to the boat leaving the dock generally tells these. Listen so that you know where all safety equipment is located in the unlikely event of an emergency. • Boat briefing; this is generally a crewmember such as the first mate that will inform you about the diving procedures from the boat. This briefing generally tells you how dive equipment should be stowed, how the crew will get you in and out of the water, and what to do in case of an emergency. This is a safety-based briefing for your benefit to ensure a safe and enjoyable dive experience. Ask any questions at the end of the briefing. During any briefing, please be considerate, the information being provided is for your safety and enjoyment, so please listen and don't have a conversation or be fiddling around. When diving from boats you should be mindful that space is limited and therefore stow all of your dive equipment in the space provided, and don't place heavy objects such as weights in places where they may fall and cause injury to someone. Know where everything is, life jackets, life rafts, medical kits and oxygen, remember your captain relayed all his
information during the briefing. In any emergency please listen to your crew, stay calm, and don't panic. Your crew is
trained to handle any situation that may occur, do as they say and act accordingly.
Sea Sickness:
If you suspect that you might be prone to seasickness, you can take preventive measures. There are many
seasickness drugs on the market and many high tech solutions such as expensive wristbands that provide a pulse,
magnet, etc. However, seasickness tablets such as Bonnine, Triptone and Dramamine work best. However, do not
take these just 2 hours prior to a dive. You need to get these drugs into your system the night before to be effective.
Always read the manufacturer's instructions prior to taking any form of drug. Preventive measures can be the
difference between a good dive experience and a bad one!
Tipping:
Just like in a restaurant or bar, the dive industry provides its divers with a service but with a subtle difference: our
focus is on your enjoyment and more importantly your safety.
Dive crews, Dive Masters and Instructors work extremely hard to ensure that your dive experience is a positive and safe one. Long before you arrive, crews and instructors are busy preparing for the day ahead, they put in long hours that are far in excess of a normal 9-5 day job and typically work on the weekends so that divers, on their days off, can enjoy the sport. Diving is a seasonal activity, dive industry pay is very low, and its employees rely on your generosity to survive. Here are some guidelines on tipping: • Tip your instructors and guides personally as they do not share in anything given to the boat crew. It is suggested that you tip 10-15% of your course fee if you feel that your instructor has done an excellent job. • Tip dive crew at least $5-$10/tank per trip ($10+ for a 2-tank trip, $15+ for a 3-tank trip). Generally there will be a jar on the boat. The crew splits the tips at the end of the day. Remember that tips are never expected but always appreciated. Last but not least:
We welcome your feedback in order to better serve the dive community. If there is anything we can do to improve
your experience we want to know. If you enjoyed your experience and feel the facility and instructors who taught
you did a great job, mention this to the facility management or drop them an email AND talk about them on your favorite
social media sites such as Facebook, Scubaboard.com, TripAdvisor, and others.
Thanks for taking the time to read this. Enjoy your diving, be a safe diver
and please respect our seas and coral reefs.

Source: http://divewithelena.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Etiquette-for-the-boat-diver.pdf

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